Thursday, April 21, 2016

חד גדיא

I don't usually cover Aramaic דקדוק and I cannot claim to know terribly much about it but it seems the entire world sings חד גדיא pronounced thusly: חד גדיא, חד גדיא דְזַבִּין אבא בתרי זוזי It's a tricky word because almost the same word is used for buying as for selling. However, it seems from the הגדות מדויקות that the proper pronunciation is in fact דִזְבַן. I haven't done too much research on this but I know someone who has. The newly published Haggada of Rabbi Jonathan Sacks by Koren Publishers also has דִזְבַן.

5 comments:

MG said...

The targum on "אֲשֶׁר קָנָה אַבְרָהָם" in Bereishis 49:30 is "דִּזְבַן אַבְרָהָם"

leo said...

Wow! Never thought about this but you're definitely right - that they're wrong.
But the ב may also be בֵ or בִ.

Dick Duke said...

Why can't it mean "that father sold"?

Lion of Zion said...

yes. and thus heidenheim corrected the text in his haggadah to dizvan.

another problem is masculine shunra with feminine akhela

Josh H said...

See the Scholar's Haggadah (p. 390) by Heinrich Guggenheimer. The original texts had Dezabbin (meaning sold), but Heidenheim and Stanow corrected it to Dizvan (bought). It was originally a song in Judeo-German (aka Yiddish) according to Guggenheimer. He brings a proof from the incorrect pairing of masculine cat (Shunra) and feminine verb (v'achla). Heidenheim corrected it to V'achal. "The feminine form is quite natural in German where Katze is feminine and remains sentimentally a feminine even in the neuter diminutive Katzlein.